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Drawn black and white sex

Drawn black and white sex


In this original work, duCille offers a new paradigm for reading black women's fiction. Much more than a period study, The Coupling Convention spans the period from to , addressing the vital questions of gender, subjectivity, race, and the canon that inform literary study today. She demonstrates the ways in which black women appropriated this novelistic device as a means of expressing and reclaiming their own identity. The first historical anthology to focus solely and widely on the subject, Sex, Love, Race gathers new essays by both younger and well-known scholars which probe why and how the specter of sex across racial boundaries has so threatened Americans of all colors and classes. In so doing, Sex, Love, Race, sketches a larger portrait of the overlapping construction of racial, ethnic, and sexual identities in America. More than just a study of the marriage tradition in black women's fiction, however, The Coupling Convention takes up and takes on many different meanings of tradition. Traversing the whole of American history, from liaisons among Indians, Europeans, and Africans to twentieth-century social scientists' fascination with sex between "Orientals" and whites, the essays cover a range of regions, races, ethnicities, and sexual orientations. Whether motivated by violent conquest, economics, lust, or love, such unions have disturbed some of America's most sacred beliefs and prejudices. Generally thought of as a convention of the white middle class, the marriage plot has received little attention from critics of African-American literature. It challenges the notion of a single black literary tradition, or of a single black feminist literary canon grounded in specifically black female language and experience, as it explores the ways in which white and black, male and female, mainstream and marginalized "traditions" and canons have influenced and cross-fertilized each other. Sex, Love, Race provides a historical foundation for contemporary discussions of sex across racial lines, which, despite the numbers of interracial marriages and multiracial children, remains a controversial issue today.

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Drawn black and white sex


In this original work, duCille offers a new paradigm for reading black women's fiction. Much more than a period study, The Coupling Convention spans the period from to , addressing the vital questions of gender, subjectivity, race, and the canon that inform literary study today. She demonstrates the ways in which black women appropriated this novelistic device as a means of expressing and reclaiming their own identity. The first historical anthology to focus solely and widely on the subject, Sex, Love, Race gathers new essays by both younger and well-known scholars which probe why and how the specter of sex across racial boundaries has so threatened Americans of all colors and classes. In so doing, Sex, Love, Race, sketches a larger portrait of the overlapping construction of racial, ethnic, and sexual identities in America. More than just a study of the marriage tradition in black women's fiction, however, The Coupling Convention takes up and takes on many different meanings of tradition. Traversing the whole of American history, from liaisons among Indians, Europeans, and Africans to twentieth-century social scientists' fascination with sex between "Orientals" and whites, the essays cover a range of regions, races, ethnicities, and sexual orientations. Whether motivated by violent conquest, economics, lust, or love, such unions have disturbed some of America's most sacred beliefs and prejudices. Generally thought of as a convention of the white middle class, the marriage plot has received little attention from critics of African-American literature. It challenges the notion of a single black literary tradition, or of a single black feminist literary canon grounded in specifically black female language and experience, as it explores the ways in which white and black, male and female, mainstream and marginalized "traditions" and canons have influenced and cross-fertilized each other. Sex, Love, Race provides a historical foundation for contemporary discussions of sex across racial lines, which, despite the numbers of interracial marriages and multiracial children, remains a controversial issue today.

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5 thoughts on “Drawn black and white sex

  1. [RANDKEYWORD
    Arashiran

    She demonstrates the ways in which black women appropriated this novelistic device as a means of expressing and reclaiming their own identity. More than just a study of the marriage tradition in black women's fiction, however, The Coupling Convention takes up and takes on many different meanings of tradition.

  2. [RANDKEYWORD
    Kazram

    In so doing, Sex, Love, Race, sketches a larger portrait of the overlapping construction of racial, ethnic, and sexual identities in America.

  3. [RANDKEYWORD
    Aralabar

    In this original work, duCille offers a new paradigm for reading black women's fiction. Much more than a period study, The Coupling Convention spans the period from to , addressing the vital questions of gender, subjectivity, race, and the canon that inform literary study today.

  4. [RANDKEYWORD
    Yozshujar

    She demonstrates the ways in which black women appropriated this novelistic device as a means of expressing and reclaiming their own identity.

  5. [RANDKEYWORD
    Gorisar

    It challenges the notion of a single black literary tradition, or of a single black feminist literary canon grounded in specifically black female language and experience, as it explores the ways in which white and black, male and female, mainstream and marginalized "traditions" and canons have influenced and cross-fertilized each other.

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